About your Search

20121128
20121206
STATION
CSPAN 18
MSNBCW 10
CNNW 8
CNBC 4
KNTV (NBC) 3
CSPAN2 2
FBC 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KOFY 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 62
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to. so should become one of america's most celebrated and beloved authors. a subset she turned into a different direction. it is a disturbing book, a worrisome book that pointed out that we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. well, since it's meant 1962 any more thought would explain a little more for you about to rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in this house in springdale, pennsylvania near pittsburgh and allegheny river. she was born about the upstairs bedrooms of this has come with at the time did not have that addition on the right-hand side dish ec. it stopped at the chimney on the right. a simple, modest house, to downstairs into upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couplet outhouses up that come to a shed in the front where they occasionally kept the horse. it was a little bit in the??? words.? it wasn't completely in the country, but there is enough property around????????t carson could explore the was often wi
. on the campaign trail we heard governor romney say he supported a green card to the every math and science graduate from our university. why should we educate some of the best minds on earth and say sorry, no room in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same proble
. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes au
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> here comes the opening bell and we're expecting a small loss for the dow. pretty flat. i'm surprised given what we've got from the president himself and the total deadlock. however, the opening bell is ringing and we're expecting a small loss down, a tiny down trend in the opening going. that's it. i've got one number for you, personal spending, surprised by that. the dow is off and running, pretty flat. up 3 points, that's all. i've got this, yum! brands, they own the fast food outfits, taco be bell, pizza hut. and lauren is here, 9%? >> yes, 9% decline for yum! brands right now. owner of taco bell, pizza hut and k.f.c. issuing negative in china where they do about 50% of their total annual revenue so that's huge. another thing we should note, stuart, yesterday you're looking at the share price now of just about $68. yesterday, yum! brands closed at an all time high. this is an interesting down turn. >> it is, but if you cut back at china, and results i
that we can get this done is because the reality is it is not rocket science -- we can get it done. mr. chairman, whether it is our current chairman, john larson, or our future chairman -- whoever gets to lead this caucus knows we have got an enthusiastic group of committed representatives of this country ready to get the job done. >> questions? >> congressman, if republicans are willing to step up and raise revenue, will house democrats provide votes to cut benefits to programs like medicare and medicaid? >> let me say that clearly, as gene sperling was sent today, the president is willing to look at what they're going to put forward in terms of revenues, but that has not been forthcoming, shall we say. with the president has been very clear is in terms of the impact on beneficiaries and beneficiaries are the people who are the recipients of medicaid, medicare, and social security -- we believe at most would agree that social security is not responsible for the deficit and should not be on at the table for discussion. with regard to the so-called entitlements -- i come from hartford,
of life. >> reporter: still, they are interested in the very possibility, one explored by science in films ranging from "war of the worlds," to modern fiction like mars attacks, and by entrepreneurs who see the human colonies on mars within 20 years. >> we're on the way to establishing a self-sustaining group. >> reporter: now, a scoop of sand picked up 180 million miles away could bring some answers at a conference next week >> if they find life exists on mars, that would be extraordinary. >> reporter: evidence, perhaps, but the odds of proof in the first pinch of martian sand? there is a much better chance of winning the powerball lottery. mike taibbi, pasadena. >> that is our broadcast for a wednesday night. thank you for joining us, if you're watching us here on earth, don't forget you can see the rockefeller christmas tree lighting right here tonight on this nbc station. i'm brian williams, we hope to see you right back here tomorrow evening. good night. we have live team coverage. >> reporter: a 15-year-old is charged as an adult after a violent crime spree. that's coming up. >>> and
one after another individuals cross receiving their masters and doctorate degrees in science, in math, engineering. the amazing thing is one after another had names that were almost imupon to pronounce -- impossible to pronounce in some cases, and clearly the majority of these engineers and scientists were going -- came from other countries and were being told they must return to them. he made the statement in his op-ed that in fact at the end rather than just a diploma, they should be given a diploma and green card. mr. speaker, i agree with thomas friedman on this subject. for each person we welcome to america with one of these high degrees, we create jobs, net jobs. we create opportunity for expansion of the kinds of businesses that, in fact, americans are prepared to work in, but often we do not have enough engineers, scientists, or math professionals. this shortage, particularly at the masters and doctorate level, is well documented. this is not something in which republicans and democrats are on different sides. this is something which we agree to it. there is some controversy,
graduate with skills that we need. people around the world with accredited degrees in science and math. get a green card and come to the u.s. of a. >> don't get too excited. the stem jobs act would give visas to 55,000 immigrant who have advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or math, stem. the problem with the bill, only 27 democrats supported, is that it would eliminate 55,000 visas from the diversity visa program. the diversity visa program is a lottery system to provide immigrants from areas with low immigration rates with the clans it come to america. democratic congresswoman of california represents silicon valley. they are the prime beneficiary, arguably, of more high skilled immigration. she is not a fan of this bill. she said this give and take approach of immigration is like a grover norquist style pledge. signing with anti-immigrant groups to never create a green card immigrant without taking one away from someone else. it isn't likely to pass in the senate since charles schumer and chris coons added a stem bill without the visa program. the obama administration sai
, in the chemical laboratory, in the health science room, they broke a vial that had some of it in it. they evacuated that school. the fire department came in with all kinds of equipment to make sure they were not exposed to it. women who are pregnant, they say don't eat fish that has mercury in it and they cautioned them, the that there is surgeonfish you can eat. there are all kinds of reasons not to be exposed to mercury. yet we continue to put it in vaccinations as a preservative. in 1929, they came up with for marisol. they tested it on 29 people who had meningitis. they all died of meningitis, but the the mercury in the vaccination was not a contributing factor. so since 1929, it has never been completely tested and they continue to use it in vaccinations. it was not so bad when wenchow got a vaccination or two or three. but now they -- when one child got a vaccination or two or three. but now they get 29. the brain tissues to not -- it stays in there and it causes severe problems. during my chairmanship, for six years, we had four years of hearings. we had people from all of th
. >> clayton: in new york city, women waiting until they're 50 to get married or have kids, beyond science or-- >> right, right. >> clayton: is that a problem? and is marriage the traditional idea of marriage suffering because women want to go further and further into the workplace? >> the idea of traditional marriage is suffering for lot of reason. the article, wasn't the whole kit and caboodle, one aspect that i was passing on, if you will. there's certainly more to the issue, the purpose of my book, how to choose a husband. this was sort after teaser. but the whole attitude for marriage in general, for young people in particular is such a negative one and that's really the premise that i'm concerned about because when you start out thinking so negatively and taught things like never depend on a man and postpone marriage as long as possible. not that there's anything wrong with postponing it, but with that attitude you're probably going to have a self-fulfilling prophesy, but turn it around. this is a good thing. marriage, family-- >> governor huckabee on our show disagreed a little. >> oka
? experts say it amounts to quack science. this from the american psychiatric association. i'm quoting now. in the last four decades, reparative therapists have not produced any rigorous scientific research to substantiate their claims of cure. until there is such research available, the apa recommends that ethical practitioners refrain from attempts to change individuals' sexual orientation, keeping in mind the medical dictum to first do no harm. stories of harm caused by reparative therapy are what prompted california to recently pass a law barring it for minors. as the apa warns, the harm can include anxiety, depression, even suicide. randi kaye profiled another young man who went through so-called reparative therapy with traumatic results. here's his story. >> reporter: when ryan was 13, his mother read his diary and discovered he was gay. that was the beginning of the most painful years of his life. >> for years, i thought that god hated me because i was gay. >> reporter: ryan says his parents were determined to change him. they signed him up for what's called reparative therapy with
's exactly the way it went. we need to fund basic science, keep it going, doing it in a smart way. we have to connect the cdc, nih, health and human services, the fda, all those organizations have to be better connected. we have to bring services and research together. we need diagnosis should be achieved at 18 months now and we have five years in many places and minorities are diagnosed later than all. they don't seem to have the right access. we need to develop better treatments and translate research into medicine. we need to alleviate discrepancies in services. i'll give you an example, andrea, 32 states have autism insurance, 75% of the nation. they represent half of the employees. the other half are in large companies. the congress has to act and make those large companies do exactly the same thing that the small companies are doing in 75% of the country. and lastly, we need to look at the needs for adults. it's, you know, we have a tsunami of children getting to the age of 22 and you lose all your benefits at that point. there's education, housing. there's employment. there's integr
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back to "power lunch." brian schactman here at the markets desk looking at five below, about a $2 million market cap, the preteen and teen specially retailer. they reported earnings and the stock is up 15% here but it is a pretty fascinating earnings report. eps and revenue were pretty solid but guidance was actually for the most part below consensus. why is it so rocketing to the up side? adjusted operating margin, about triple expectations and comps were 50% better than expectations. those two metrics are pretty important. this was an ipo over the summer and it is about double from its initial public offering. back to you. >> thank you
can still invest in things like education, and training and science and research research. i know some of this may sound familiar to you because we talked a lot about this during campaign. this shouldn't be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and in congressional campaigns all across the country, and a clear majority of americans, not just democrats, but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy and doesn't hurt middle class families. and i'd glass to see if you've been reading the papers lately that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so, if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. the senate has already passed a bill that keeps income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to vote for that same bill today. if we can get a few house republicans to agree as w
degree who we want to keep here in science, technology, engineering, and math. in many cases, if they're not allowed to stay, they will have to return to other countries and the jobs will follow them, costing our country jobs. choose between them and allowing people here from countries other than mexico, india, and china. some of whom are high skilled, some of whom are low skilled, divorce group across the board and looking back at many of our own forebears, certainly mine mitigating circumstance family came to this country in the late 19th century and early 20th century, 1890's, 1905. they didn't have master's degrees they zrntpampede's they didn't have college degrees. and that's the case for many of our forebears. and here today their great grandson sits as a member of congress. and had a program then existed whereby they could arrive nellliss island and be here, i wouldn't be here today my father has a ph.d. but that's a legacy of his hardworking immigrant grandparents who came to this country without a college degree. and in many cases without something that's the equivalent of e
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> you are watching cnbc's "squawk on the street." we're just a minute and a half away before the opening bell rings. we're right now looking at a slightly higher open according to the futures. could be a big session for luxury names. tiffany getting a downgrade getting whacked once again after the dismal numbers coming out yesterday morning. >> merrill lynch takes it down. i see people abandoning the name. people are trying to figure out what's an outlier and who is doing well. there are too many misses here. >> i don't know -- some may say it's a problem with luxury consumer spending but in today's session we have companies hitting two decade highs in europe. high end is doing okay in europe. >> german retail sales today were not good. >> how do we deal with the fact that europe stock 600 closed at a 52-week high. >> or that confidence is at a four-year high in italy. >> even though germany clearly headed into a downturn. what a remarkable m
provide green cards pr those skilled in science and technology and math. foreign internationals who have earned degrees from an american university can stay here and use their skills to improve the american workforce. sounds like a great idea, right? sure, but it does so at the expense of other immigrants. and as "the new york times" points out, it eliminates another visa category entirely. the visas set aside for people from countries with low immigration rates to the united states. so the 55,000 stem visas would come at the expense of 55,000 diversity visas. that's a zero sum gain. the elimination of diversity visas would primary affect immigrants from african countries. but despite the discriminatory nature of the bill, republicans insist it's going to create jobs and they are calling out the democrats opposition to the legislation. >> once again, the house is taking the lead on legislation that is going to help create jo jobs. >> we believe as this was the first step forward in terms of trying to address the need for modernization in our visa laws. >> the democrats had two years to d
then drove to the science building killed a faculty member in front of the students then committed suicide. witness told police the killer used a bow and arrow. he was not a student. police say he knew the victims although they have not said washington the relationship wa was. >>> there was a terrifying scene in a small town in new jersey today. train derailment set a hazardous gas spewing that the air. more than 70 people sought medical treatment from the fumes. lindsaydavis tonight on the hidden risk passing through towns every day. >> thousands of gallons of the hazardous chemical vinyl chloride spewed into the air prosecute the ruptured car. resident told to stay in the home. 3 schools within a mile ordered to keep students indoors. >> we are saying to all watching this that live within the borough of paul's borrow it's a sign for caution. >>reporter: 71 people admitted to local hospital. vinyl chloride is a colorless gas. inhague it can cause problems breathing high levels can cause loss of consciousness and extremely high levels can cause death. >> there are concerns about th
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! chooswhat's in your wallet? with 2% cash back [ male announcer ] zeebox is the free app that makes tv even better. if your tv were a space captain, zeebox would be an alien, first officer. just like an officer helps a captain explore the universe, zeebox helps you discover what shows are most popular, where the biggest buzz is, or what the stars are watching now. download zeebox free, and let your tv go where it's never gon >>> as the holiday season approaches, one stock that's been pretty naughty in 2012. but after a big move today, may end up on the nice list. i'm talking abou
with the rhetoric of epidemic is that it seems to stand in contravention to a growing amount of science exploring whether or not we are seeing a rise in incidents or a rise in diagnosis, but also i am concerned about the population that the congressman mentioned earlier, many of whom are my members and mr. carley's members who have gone through decades without a diagnosis or who have been misdiagnosed. the perception that autism is some recent new thing has been very damaging, in part because it has meant that when we talk about autistic adults of all, which we do very rarely, we never talk about their needs. we talk about it as something very recently on the horizon, about to be on the horizon. we have to recognize that this is a very serious situation. it is a serious situation now. it is a crisis not for public health but up on that needs and of human rights. >> that goes to my very question -- tell me the kind of services that are lacking that you would like to see provided? so that we can try and figure out how we can use our dollars effectively and efficiently to not only -- i think it was
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. >>> joining me for today's strategy session, paul begala along with cnn contributor erick erickson, editor and chief of the conservative political blog redstate.com. president obama went today to pennsylvania to a toy store, part of his p.r. strategy to try to sell his plans on the fiscal cliff. now, we know this works well for him in politics. he's won two elections obviously. but the question really i think today is whether this very same kind of thing is as effective when the president is pushing a policy issue. and i suppose, paul, i just ought to start with you in that. >> oh, i think it is, joe. first off, the president, yes, he served in the senate for like five minutes, but he's not a creature of wa
tara wall was a senior media adviser for. an associate professor of science at columbia university. a fellow at the roosevelt institute and manuel reyes. thanks for having you here. it's nice to have you. >>> tara, welcome to nerdland. >> how did i know you were coming to me first. >> now i would like you to explain your party. >> lay it all on the table. >> in a certain way, it's so early, i feel silly talking about it. but i do think it's important that we not sort of come out of a win as i've seen both parties do in midterm elections or general elections with this narrative, oh, the other party is over. this is the decisive election. i don't think we see anything like that. when you look at the new herd, what seems to you like the things that are different? >> i think, number one, there are a couple of things. i think as you mentioned, it is a little more diverse, both ethnically and sexwise. i mean, you have a few more women which i think is great. i think after any election, everybody does recalibrating and lessons learned. i think what you don't want to lose sight of is the f
in fisheries and wildlife science from kansas state university in 1999, and her masters degree in biology from fort hayes state university in kansas. she loved the outdoors and was said to be at peace in nature. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her
students ranking 5th in math, 17th in science, and 14th in reading. now, the president does not support education cuts. but this is what congress, you know, comes up with, cutting in places where we need it most. the seeds of our future are our kids and their education. what does this say about our priorities? >> our priorities are focused on the adults in the schools and not the children in the schools. we want to make sure when we're talking about education reform, we want to make sure that it's reform around the edges as opposed to creating a better school system. the a.c.t. which last year became the most-taken test found that 75% of all children in america who took the test, in fact, were not college ready. that's not 75% of the kids in the hood. that's not 75% of black and latino kids that listen to hip-hop, that's abercrombie & fitch white kids in the suburbs not ready to go on to college. we need to make sure that if we're going to pay a world-class cost for education, we need to get a world-class product of education. >> so for parents out there that are listening to this and t
on the brands you want. walmart. 1. >>> science, technology, engineering and mathematics would provide visas to 55 immigrants annual tloi receive degrees in those fields and use what they learned and a apply that to american jobs. eric cantor praised the bill's package. >> we have seen not only american students, but many, many foreign nationals have come to this country to be educated at our colleges and universities. specifically in the s.t.e.m. areas in the graduate education programs. the bill that we passed will allow these individuals to have a green card if they get a diploma. >> democrats in the white house oppose the bill. it's likely doa in the senate. >> if you support this bill, you're saying that one group of immigrants is better than another. we take away visas and the only means of legal immigration from 50,000 people who may not have ph.d.s or master's degrees. talk about picking winners and losers. >> joining us now is the congressman who introduced the bill. it seems to solve a couple of problems at once. it keeps highly skilled tech work workers here in the country. it mak
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story "outfront," panic in syria. at this moment tonight, there is fear the assad regime is getting desperate, so today, much of the country experienced a second day without internet access. it's a pretty incredible thing. i just want to show you this chart. internet activity was going up and up, then off. can you just imagine life in that situation? no one is sure why and as violence continues on the ground, there's a debate at home as to whether even at this what seems to be late hour, that the united states should get involved. senators have repeatedly called for the united states to arm the rebel forces, but the administration is not yet ready to do it. >> will providing arms to the opposition convince the people who support bashar al assad in many cases because they are afraid of their own existence, or will it simply lead to more fighting? that is the question that we are considering. >> it's a crucial question. "outfront" tonight, alex, author and former reporter for the
journal science" that claims the polar ice sheets are melting at record rates. up to five times faster than in the '90s. look at this video. it's fascinating. time lapse video from greenland. the report says that country and antarctica are losing 344 billion metric tons of ice a year equal to the weight of more than a million empire state buildings. scientists say these findings are important because the melting is causing sea levels to rise, and that makes coastal storms, say superstorm sandy, worse because of the massive flooding that's caused. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ♪ ...could end with adding a close friend. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring
,000 green cards that people with advanced degrease with science and engineering. doug mckelway live on the hill with the story this morning. this bill failed in september. why are republicans bringing it back now? >> reporter: bill, it failed back in september because it was brought up under suspension rules which requires 2/3 majority so it failed. it is coming back today under normal house rules which require simple majority and republicans are very confident after they that he have they have the votes of after the election results of november 6th they need to show strong advocacy of immigration. here is one of the strong supporters of the bill, raul labrador of idaho. melissa: at the same time we don't need to change our agenda. too many republicans say we need to abandon our agenda and become a different party. washington clearly doesn't need two liberal parties. >> reporter: it would do away with what is called the green card lottery, which gives 55,000 cards randomly selected by computer people from country with traditionally low immigration rates to the united states. that me
of couch potatoes out there. this study in the journal of environmental science and technology showed that and average there are 44 different chemicals in the couches that were sampled in different u.s. homes. some of these chemicals are known to be of concern, they've already been banned in babies' clothes, they are believe to be cancer causing in high doses. >> is it from sitting on the couches, breathing in the air, exactly how do you get exposed to it? >> no one has made the connection between what is in the couch, these chemicals and health. but it is known that these chemicals exist in the couch and this study simply described the variation and the main type of chemicals in koups, and the authors of the study say let's try to keep your couches clean and don't save a couch for 15 or 20 years like most people do. jenna: if you have a really nice couch -- you know, doc, i think about our viewers with this. if you watch the news today we are already telling people b be ware of the fiscal cliff, an islamic egypt, a nuclear iran and if you want to sit on your couch this weekend be war
an impact on brain function. as science and medicine progressed, society has come to understand mental illness with clarity. senator conrad and crapo wanted to strike the word lunatic from the united states code. i thank them for their effort and i encourage my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill to modernize or codified law to reflect the 21st century understanding of mental illness. and i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: this bill eliminates outdated references in the u.s. code that stigmatize individuals with mental illness. this legislation easily passed the senate with strong bipartisan support. the bill eliminates the word lunatic from the -- several sections of the united states code in order for our code to reflect meanings which are much more appropriate and up to date in the 21st century. in the past members of congress on both sides of the aisle have worked
income and if you don't have income you can't pay income taxes. that's not rocket science. got to get folks back to work and more, mr. speaker. if you're a family of four and you're earning $30,000 a year, you can't afford to pay the bills of this country in the same way that someone making $200,000 a year can. that's ok. we understand that. that's why there are graduated rates in the income tax code. some people 10%. some people pay 15%. some people pay 25%. some people pay in the 30's. the more you have the more we think you're able to contribute, but here we are in what every american economist would agree is one of the most dire economic circumstances of our time and what i hear described as leadership from the president is don't change anything for the 80%. in fact, spend more on the 80% and go tap that last 1% to pay all the bills. the top 1% are already paying all the bills. . this chart i would say demonstrates a moral imperative that we have the and grapple with as american citizens, as members of the greatest self-ruling nation the history of the world, what we have already
, science, and research. now, i know some of this may sound familiar to you because we talked a lot about this during the campaign. this shouldn't be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and in congressional campaigns all across the country and a clear majority of americans, not just democrats but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy and doesn't hurt middle class families. and i'm glad to see, if you've been reading the papers lately, that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. the senate's already passed a bill that keeps income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to vote for that same bill today. if we can get a few house republicans to agree as well, i'll sign this bill as soon as congress sends it my way. i'
country together. bill nye the science guy, naturally this really upset confederate soldier nicolas cage, but why and more importantly how does this happen? for the answer we turn to science. >> the estimate is that there's about 200 genes that actually make up the facial composition so if you think about a slot machine, what are the odds you would get 200 rows on a slot machine to line up. >> reporter: what's the number? what are the chances that i have a twin out there who looks exactly like me. >> 1 in a billion. >> reporter: 1 in a billion with a "b." . do people tell you look like anybody? >> oh, you look like elizabeth taylor when you were young or fran dresh sneer do i look like anybody famous? >> you look like you because you are famous. >> reporter: oh, my gosh, i love you. so the next time someone tells you look look like -- >> kevin durant. >> robert downey jr. >> jennifer lopez. >> this little guy they say he looks like bruce willis. >> reporter: i see it, i see it, really. >>> and there it is, and there is truth behind it. we all have a number of genes to make up our facial
the training and education of science technology, engineering, and math. this is what this legislation is about. we want america to be the magnet for the best minds. we want them to come here, get educated, and stay here to improve our lives and turn it into a reality right here in america so that america continues to be the land of opportunity for all. >> today we put another down payment on jobs and job creation. for each of these visas that are granted, it is estimated that there'll be three additional u.s. jobs created. for each of these individuals who apply, they will look at who the student population is in the united states working on masters and phd's and stem areas. this of be at a diverse population. this cause us to see this as an improvement in diversity outreach. almost anyone who attends a graduation at the masters and phd level, you will see those crossing the line coming from all over the world and in all colors and sizes. that is why we did this today. we want this to be one that says, who wants to come to be america and has a likelihood of success in creating success for all
-hbut some people wondered oveabout caffeine.es. the executive director of the center for science in the public interest said, "overdoing caffeine alone is actually pretty difficult to do. someone would have to make an effort to consume 40 or so 200-mg caffeine tablets." or... about this much 5-hour energy... in a single day. we recommend... not more than two per day. yeah, when we first came out with the product... you know, i made sure of one thing. if my family wasn't going to use it... if it wasn't good enough for my family if it wasn't safe for my family... i'm not gonna put it out there. i take it almost every day. and twice when i play tennis. this is our criteria that we have to be safe... if we're not willing to do it ourselves... we're not asking anybody else to do it. we're not gonna sell it. so, that's our approach to safety... that is a higher standard you can get. adt can help you turn on a few lights. access cameras from anywhere to help you keep an eye on things. even bring family in from the cold when you're not there. now get the advanced technology of adt starti
of roseman university of health and sciences. in 1999 dr. rosenburg rented a small office space in henderson, nevada, believing he could establish a pharmacy school that would produce highly-skilled graduates ready to be recruited for work across the country. his innovative approach to education led him to develop a block format curriculum that emphasizes a student-centered active learning environment, allowing students to participate in experiencal education from the very beginning of their studies and complete their doctor al degree in just three years instead of the traditional four. making roseman one of the most affordable pharmacy schools in the nation. during his tenure, dr. rosenburg helped transform roseman of a local school of 38 students to a regional institution with over 1,000 and offering an array of quality programs in nursing, dentistry and business administration. mr. heck: as he prepared for retirement, i commend dr. rosenburg for his vision, innovation and commitment to offering students an affordable, state-of-the-art education that has and will benefit the state of nevad
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's justommosense, from td ameritrade.
, the bringing in a science and technology. you are a world bank guy. you went to harvard and dell was science and technology. here we are was tremendous knowledge in these fields. we talk about helping democracies. how do you see that from not only indicating these villages but scholarships and others, whether it is the french, the canadians, the brits, so that there are always for educational, the empowerment of women come are raising their status, inclusion. the american bar society and all those groups. what do you think about that? is it such that unless you have big muscular defense, big muscular foreign aid? i don't think america will ever be a wimp in anything, but i have an additional school of thought. what do you think? what could help that in america? >> thank you. generally, to speak a very frankly and what you have requested, the support of law enforcement in colombia has been helpful. that is a first step. as you said coming in several points to develop. increasing security capabilities and increasing the state's capability to promote human rights. in a case like ours, we have h
and being ready, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. we have a big, big hour and the i.q. will go way up. how are you ever going to solve the problem if you don't look at all of the pieces? >>tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. >>you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. >>sharp tongue, quick whit and above all, politically direct. >>you just think there is no low they won't go to. oh, no. if al gore's watching today... [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> announcer: this is the "full court press." the "bill press show." live on your radio and on current tv. >> bill: hey, it is 14 minutes before the top of the hour here on this wednesday morning. november 28. before we get back to the issues of the day for the last two days, you have heard at this time of the program in our programs both me and stephanie miller ask for your help for the salvation army. contest we've been running here on current tv. we are no longer going to be part of t
. >> gretchen: one student may want to study the next time a science professor made sure the whole world could see the students' wrong answer. you are got to come it your screen to check this out. the exam asks which park could be a volcano and the student circled gary busey! as in the actor! >> steve: he's a volcano. >> gretchen: i'm not sure he's a volume kay nome the student admitted to circling answers without looking. >> brian: everyone has their private strategyies. >> steve: i wonder if he will ever graduate. the reason i mention that in a hugely popular commencement speech he gave in 2009 at the university of tennessee, iconic music star dolly parton told graduates how her dream of making it big in the music industry took her from a install town in tennessee to the top of the entertainment business. >> the night i graduated from high school back in 1964, we were all asked to stand up and talk about what we were going to do with the rest of our lives and everybody had a different story and when it came my time, i stood right up there and said, i'm going to nashville and i'm going to be
it is superstition but it is not like there is a science to winning the lottery. >> you don't get a better chance by doing quick pick. >> bill: let's hear the numbers here. i want to check here. okay. >> the number five. next up is number 23. here is a picture of ricky la grange from louisiana. he won $1 million. after that, we've got the number 22. round it out tonight with the number 29. all right now for tonight's winning powerball number and for that over half a billion jackpot, it is the number 6. cyprian. >> bill: i had a 22 somewhere and a 29 somewhere. if i could put them together. cyprian got the powerball number. >> bill: he got some dough. >> a couple of bucks. >> if you just hit the powerball, it is $2 i think. >> bill: so there were winners in arizona and missouri. red states. this is not fair. it is a conspiracy. >> that's not change we can believe in. >> bill: did you get anything at all? >> no. i'm going to double check later. i just go to the counter and scan them. >> bill: i'll never play po
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)